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Beethoven Symphony No.9

NI6146
£14.99

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Yondani Butt's release in his inestimable Beethoven cycle proves to be quite a revelation. Butt is high on drama similar to Erich Kleiber's landmark version but he also finds great humanity in the Scherzo. The conductor adopts a brisk tempo throughout the Adagio, quite a remarkable achievement on all counts and thus the movement flows along quite nicely.  The finale is imbued with a sense of dramatic realism.
Classiccal Net by Gerald Fenech

 

Beethoven Symphony No.9

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Mention Beethoven to anybody, and one of the first works which generally springs to mind is his Ninth Symphony. Though Beethoven himself considered his Missa Solemnis, written at the same time, to be his greatest work, it is his Symphony No.9 which has proved the most enduring, not least because of its innovative and compelling choral finale, with the famous, irresistible ‘Ode to Joy’. Yet, as with any popular work, it is vital to approach each listening with fresh ears, ready to hear something new. For there is no doubting that this is a work of great profundity, from its subtle opening, growing as though out of infinite space, to the climactic final movement which moves beyond ‘joy’ to the ecstatic, the transcendental.

Reviews

"Beethoven's Ninth Symphony is obviously one of the toughest nuts to crack but Yondani Butt's second release in his inestimable Beethoven cycle proves to be quite a revelation. The conductor adopts a brisk temp throughout and manages to dispatch the Adagio in just less than 17 minutes, quite a remarkable achievement on all counts and thus the movement flows along quite nicely.

Butt is also high on drama in the First movement similar to Erich Kleiber's landmark Decca version but he also finds great humanity in the Scherzo which remains one of my favourite Beethoven movements. The Finale is imbued with a sense of dramatic realism although no one to my mind at least surpasses Fritz Lehmann's great 1959 account on DG – an underrated version if ever there was one.

Nimbus provides substantial notes as well as texts and translations of the final movement so this new issue is also recommended as a library choice".  Gerald Fenech www.classical.net