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Julie London: Cry me A River - Her 62 Finest (including the complete Julie Is Her Name)

RTS4300
£10.99

Details

“Sultry” was the word for Julie London (1926-2000), describing both her sensual presence and her intimate, breathy voice; one of the most distinctive, evocative – and ubiquitous – sounds of the 50s. Retrospective’s tribute offers the cream from the first 15 of her remarkable series of Liberty LPs, beginning with the whole of her debut album Cry Me A River. Julie’s laidback delivery of romantic songs is sensitively enhanced by Barney Kessel’s guitar artistry and the deft foundation of Ray Leatherwood’s bass – together they worked the worked the sort of magic that makes an album immortal. Throughout all the selections for this double-CD survey the same qualities shine through: the musicianly phrasing, the true intonation and the direct, natural style. The choice of material is invariably top-drawer, and includes five memorable original songs by husband and producer Bobby Troup. Julie London was a unique phenomenon. For so many who lived through the late 50s she remains an iconic image of enticing womanhood, with a smoky voice that could persuade any man to “Cry Me A River”. Here are 62 exquisite reminders.

Julie London: Cry me A River - Her 62 Finest (including the complete Julie Is Her Name)

Reviews

American singer and actress Julie London had a career that spanned five decades. She released 32 albums of pop and jazz standards during the 1950s and 1960s, with her signature song being the classic Cry Me a River, which she introduced in 1955. Her acting career began in films in 1944, and included playing opposite Gary Cooper in Man of the West and Robert Mitchum in The Wonderful Country. She was born in 1926 in Santa Rosa, California, the daughter of vaudeville song-and-dance team Jack and Josephine Peck, and made her début singing professionally on her parents’ radio show. She was discovered by talent agent Sue Carol (wife of actor Alan Ladd) and her long recording career began in 1955 with a live performance at the 881 Club in Los Angeles. Billboard named her the most popular female vocalist for 1955, 1956 and 1957, and she was the subject of a 1957 Life cover article in which she was quoted as saying, ‘It’s only a thimbleful of a voice, and I have to use it close to the microphone. But it is a kind of oversmoked voice, and it automatically sounds intimate.’ ‘Sultry’ was always the word for Julie London, describing both her sensual presence and her wonderfully distinctive, breathy voice. Retrospective’s double-CD tribute features the cream from the first 15 of her remarkable series of Liberty LPs, beginning with the whole of her debut album Cry Me A River. Julie’s laidback delivery of romantic songs is sensitively enhanced by Barney Kessel’s distinctive guitar artistry and the deft foundation of Ray Leatherwood’s bass - together they worked the worked the sort of magic that makes an album immortal. Throughout all the 62 exquisite tracks the same qualities shine through: the musicianly phrasing, the true intonation and the direct, natural style. The choice of material is top-drawer, and includes five memorable original songs by husband and producer Bobby Troup. Julie London was a unique phenomenon. For so many who lived through the late 50s she remains an iconic image of enticing womanhood, with a smoky voice that could persuade any man to Cry Me A River. newclassics.co.uk