Nimbus Records on Facebook Nimbus Records on Twitter Nimbus Records on YouTube

Newsletter

 

Pirates Of The Baroque

RP004
£14.99

Details

'Shiver me timbers!' In one fell swoop early music quartet, Red Priest (RP) have patterned their 2008 CD release, Pirates of the Baroque, on the Jerry Bruckheimer/Disney Pictures franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean. And it's just the sort of thing that might appeal to irrepressible Captain Jack Sparrow. The foursome are outrageous, hugely entertaining, and Red Priest take no prisoners. In contrast to conventional chamber quartet configuration Red Priest consists of recorders, violin, cello and harpsichord (Adams, Bishop, East and Beach respectively). And each one of the above is demonstrably a dab hand at every sizzling technical hurdle their own formidable arrangements require. Purists might blanch at what they do with music of the Baroque, but the rest of us can revel in their exuberance, irreverence, and dazzling virtuosity. Adams launches into Leclair's 2'20" Tambourin with puff-defying breath control and jet assisted fingers. Whereupon, after fifty-four fleet seconds the three remaining instruments inject a central episode of stirring, near orchestral weight and timbre; a buzzing double stopped glissando from Bishop and the whole madcap frolic ends like the Sailors' Hornpipe at the Proms.

Pirates Of The Baroque

Reviews

"An amazing disc... an extraordinary performance from one of the most exhilarating groups I’ve encountered in many a long year." - DAVID MELLOR on CLASSIC FM - THE NEW CD SHOW March 21 2009

"Anyone yet to encounter Red Priest should be alerted to their performances coming with a health warning. Purists might blanch at what they do with music of the Baroque, but the rest of us can revel in their exuberance, irreverence and dazzling virtuosity." - THE DAILY TELEGRAPH Classical CD of the Week **** February 14th 2009

 

"I love this swashbuckling CD... Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum to RedPriest!" - CLASSIC FM MAGAZINE August 2009 Presenter's Choice

'Shiver me timbers!' In one fell swoop early music quartet, Red Priest (RP) have patterned their 2008 CD release, Pirates of the Baroque, on the Jerry Bruckheimer/Disney Pictures franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean. And it's just the sort of thing that might appeal to irrepressible Captain Jack Sparrow. The foursome are outrageous, hugely entertaining, and Red Priest take no prisoners. In contrast to conventional chamber quartet configuration Red Priest consists of recorders, violin, cello and harpsichord (Adams, Bishop, East and Beach respectively). And each one of the above is demonstrably a dab hand at every sizzling technical hurdle their own formidable arrangements require. Purists might blanch at what they do with music of the Baroque, but the rest of us can revel in their exuberance, irreverence, and dazzling virtuosity. Adams launches into Leclair's 2'20" Tambourin with puff-defying breath control and jet assisted fingers. Whereupon, after fifty-four fleet seconds the three remaining instruments inject a central episode of stirring, near orchestral weight and timbre; a buzzing double stopped glissando from Bishop and the whole madcap frolic ends like the Sailors' Hornpipe at the Proms.

For the album's title (tracks 7-17) Howard Beach has compiled a suite from Couperin's Ordres. With this he aims to represent scenes from the life of a baroque pirate — injecting some vocals and a snatch from Handel's Messiah. In the 'Chaccone' (attributed to Vitali) ever-inventive Adams departs from two arrangements for violin by virtuoso Ferdinand David (1867) and by Léopold Charlier with Zino Francescatti (1911). In one of the programme's calmest pieces, Giuseppe Tartini's Senti lo Mare ('I Listen to the Sea'), Adams invokes the whisper of the waves by blowing into the finger-hole of his tenor recorder while Bishop adds a faraway, eerie, whistling lure of the ocean's mysteries. While Red Priest depart from the letter of Vivaldi's works, the spirit, buoyancy and sheer ingenuity of his music is preserved. As The Telegraph astutely commented: 'Beneath all the fun and games there is a bedrock of terrific skill and timing that gives this inimitable group the wherewithal to take the liberties it does.' 'We tend to forget that people in the olden days were having fun', Adams says. 'They were like us, and they weren't all serious and earnest and wondering how they should do it. They were experimenting and doing their own thing.' So 'Splice the mainbrace'; then sit back; enjoy some sparkling musical fun. HOWARD SMITH