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Tchaikovsky: Symphonies Nos. 5&6 and The Voyevoda

NI7104
£10.99

Details

Yondani Butt was born in Macau. He studied conducting with Wolfgang Vacano (1906–1985) at Indiana University, majoring in chemistry. He continued to study conducting with Josef Blatt (1906–1999) at the University of Michigan while pursuing his chemistry degree. Hailed by Robert Marsh of the Chicago Sun Times as “an outstanding talent”, Yondani Butt has received acclamation from critics and audiences for his many CD recordings and concert performances. He died on 28th August 2014."...a bargain-priced two-CD set, marvellous, natural orchestral recording from Abbey Road and, on the whole, some very fine playing by the ever-reliable LSO."

Tchaikovsky: Symphonies Nos. 5&6 and The Voyevoda

Reviews

…bargain-priced two-CD set, marvellous, natural orchestral recording from Abbey Road and, on the whole, some very fine playing by the ever-reliable LSO.

Symphony No. 5 is beautifully played, and clearly the orchestra sounds happy and relaxed as it sets about delivering some really lush textures. After the last notes of the symphony have died away, The Voyevode immediately kicks in and the contrast with the symphony is startling. All of a sudden there is far more drive and urgency in the music-making. Lush textures give way to drama and that is entirely appropriate for such a dramatic work. This is one of the composer’s near-misses but the LSO turn in a very good performance.

Symphony No. 6 takes us back to Butt’s general preference for lush romanticism but, considering that we are talking about Tchaikovsky’s Sixth here, I do not see that as a problem. The Allegro molto vivace is unhurried and playful, and the recording gives the woodwind plenty of space. The brass outbursts have great presence and bite. Butt generates some real excitement here, the concluding Adagio lamentoso is one of the great movements in the 19th-century symphonic repertoire and a remarkable way for the composer to end the work. Butt scores high marks here. The tragic emotional outpourings he generates from the orchestra are both tangible and moving. John Whitmore, MusicWeb